Hemp Thread.

Discussion in 'Φ Health' started by Nigella, Jan 17, 2015.

  1. A place to talk about pot. :)
     
  2. Something a little shorter for those who want just the gist of it...
     
  3. Recipe To Make Cannabis Oil For Chemo Alternative

    “Once the public becomes aware of the fact that properly made hemp medicine can cure or control practically anymedical condition, who is going to stand up against the use of hemp?”

    Rick Simpson has dedicated his life to helping suffering patients (with all types of diseases and disabilities) with the use of natural hemp oil.

    RICK SIMPSON’S HEMP OIL PROVES EFFECTIVE IN CURING CANCER
    Rick Simpson is a medical marijuana activist who has been providing people with information about the healing powers of Hemp Oil medications for nearly a decade now. Rick cured himself of a metastatic skin cancer back in 2003, and has since then devoted his life to spreading the truth of hemp oil. He has met an absurd amount of opposition and lack of support from Canadian authorities, as well as pharmaceutical companies, government agencies for health, and UN offices. Despite that fact, Rick Simpson has successfully treated over 5,000 patients (free of charge), and believes that all forms of disease and conditions are treatable. He states that it is common to have all types of cancer and diseases cured with the use of high quality hemp oil as a treatment.

    Rick has treated patients will all types of conditions including, but not limited to, cancer, AIDS, arthritis, multiple sclerosis, diabetes, leukemia, Crohn’s disease, depression, osteoporosis, psoriasis, insomnia, glaucoma, asthma, burns, migraines, regulation of body weight, chronic pain, and mutated cells (polyps, warts, tumors).



    “RUN FROM THE CURE” OFFICIAL VIDEO DOCUMENTARY
    This documentary “Run From The Cure” was made by Christian Laurette in 2008 and shares Rick Simpson’s story. The movie features interviews with people who were cured by Rick’s oil, but were refused from testifying on Rick’s behalf in the Supreme Court of Canada in his 2007 trial. This video documentary does a great job explaining the medicinal benefits of hash oil.

    “I want people to know how to heal themselves.”

    Rick Simpson believes that the oral ingestion of hemp oil seeks out, and destroys cancer cells in the body. When used as a topical, hemp oil can control or even cure various skin conditions such as melanomas.
    However, as with any ‘drug’, too much hemp oil may cause some side effects; the most notable three are hungry, happy, and sleepy. This is an extremely safe medication compared to the hundreds of drugs that are approved with little to no study, and provided to patients that experience horrible side effects including death. Nobody has ever died from cannabis in any form.

    RICK SIMPSON’S HASH OIL RECIPE:
    To make the Rick Simpson’s hash oil, start with one ounce of dried herb. One ounce will typically produce 3-4 grams of oil, although the amount of oil produced per ounce will vary strain to strain. A pound of dried material will yield about two ounces of high quality oil.

    IMPORTANT: These instructions are directly summarized from Rick Simpson’s website. Be VERY careful when boiling solvent off [solvent-free option], the flames are extremely flammable. AVOID smoking, sparks, stove-tops, and red hot heating elements. Set up a fan to blow fumes away from the pot, and set up in a well-ventilated area for whole process.

    1. Place the completely dry material in a plastic bucket.

    2. Dampen the material with the solvent you are using. Many solvents can be used [solvent-free option]. You can use pure naphtha, ether, butane, 99% isopropyl alcohol, or even water. Two gallons of solvent is required to extract the THC from one pound, and 500 ml is enough for an ounce.

    3. Crush the plant material using a stick of clean, untreated wood or any other similar device. Although the material will be damp, it will still be relatively easy to crush up because it is so dry.

    4. Continue to crush the material with the stick, while adding solvent until the plant material is completely covered and soaked. Remain stirring the mixture for about three minutes. As you do this, the THC is dissolved off the material into the solvent.

    5. Pour the solvent oil mixture off the plant material into another bucket. At this point you have stripped the material of about 80% of its THC.

    6. Second wash: again add solvent to the mixture and work for another three minutes to extract the remaining THC.

    7. Pour this solvent oil mix into the bucket containing the first mix that was previously poured out.

    8. Discard the twice washed plant material.

    9. Pour the solvent oil mixture through a coffee filter into a clean container.

    10. Boil the solvent off: a rice cooker will boil the solvent off nicely, and will hold over a half gallon of solvent mixture. CAUTION: avoid stove-tops, red hot elements, sparks, cigarettes, and open flames as the fumes are extremely flammable.

    11. Add solvent to rice cooker until it is about ¾ full and turn on HIGH heat. Make sure you are in a well-ventilated area and set up a fan to carry the solvent fumes away. Continue to add mixture to cooker as solvent evaporates until you have added it all to the cooker.

    12. As the level in the rice cooker decreases for the last time, add a few drops of water (about 10 drops of water for a pound of dry material). This will help to release the solvent residue, and protect the oil from too much heat.

    13. When there is about one inch of solvent-water mixture in the rice cooker, put on your oven mitts and pick the unit up and swirl the contents until the solvent has finished boiling off.

    14. When the solvent has been boiled off, turn the cooker to LOW heat. At no point should the oil ever reach over 290˚ F or 140˚ C.

    15. Keep your oven mitts on and remove the pot containing the oil from the rice cooker. Gently pour the oil into a stainless steel container

    16. Place the stainless steel container in a dehydrator, or put it on a gentle heating device such as a coffee warmer. It may take a few hours but the water and volatile terpenes will be evaporated from the oil. When there is no longer any surface activity on the oil, it is ready for use.

    17. Suck the oil up in a plastic syringe, or in any other container you see fit. A syringe will make the oil easy to dispense. When the oil cools completely it will have the consistency of thick grease.

    Source:

    www.hempforfuture.com

    - See more at: http://truthseekerdaily.com/2015/01...l-for-chemo-alternative/#sthash.lDDpmlxF.dpuf
     
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  4. Rose

    Rose Φ

    Mark mentioned something about a smell proof bag that seeds might be sent in.
    Have you ever heard of that Nigella?
     
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  5. I might know something about that :D
     
  6. Rose

    Rose Φ

    I will pm further about this subect.
     
  7. I already did :D
     
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  8. Meet ‘Sugar Bob’ – The Cannabis Eating Deer
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    Richard Davis, known to his local community as “Pa Butt,” is a medical marijuana grower in Southeast Oregon and co-owner of the Applegate River Lodge. For 23 years he’s spent his time carefully tending to his plants, running the infamous lodge (as seen on Fox’s reality show, Hotel Hell), and raising a few animals along the way, including ‘Sugar Bob,’ a young deer that Davis has been raising on goat’s milk.

    In a video published by OPG (see below), Sugar Bob is seen following Davis as he works, nibbling the marijuana leaves that fall to the ground. Deer are devout vegetarians, and are known to feast on outdoor cannabis plants, which can be troublesome for some medical marijuana growers. Fortunately, this isn’t the case for Davis.

    When I’m down here, he either stays pretty close to me, or he’ll go in the trim room and cleans up all the [excess cannabis] on the floor, [until] he’s ready for a nap,” David told OPG.

    Davis’s friends are quick to notice Sugar Bob’s antics, especially when he eats larger, fully cured marijuana buds.

    I had a friend say to me, ‘that deer, that’s not right, other deer are out there getting chased by cougars and here’s your deer, laying on your bed, eating a big bud,’ and as he’s laying there, he’s getting sleepier and sleepier,” Davis laughed. “I had to crawl into bed with him and sleep for a few hours.”

    But Sugar Bob wasn’t Davis’s first pet deer, he explains. The first Sugar Bob was a companion for his old dog Bacon, 14 years ago. Today, a similar cycle is playing out, as Sugar Bob is a great friend to his Beagle, Trouper D.

    That’s why Sugar Bob is here, Sugar Bob is here to help him pass on.”

    See Sugar Bob’s adorable story below.
     
  9. Watch What Happens When Cannabis Is Injected Into Cancer Cells. This Is Mind Blowing.

    Back in 1974 there was a study done from the Washington Post that stated that THC, “slowed the growth of lung cancers, breast cancers and a virus-induced leukemia in laboratory mice, and prolonged their lives by as much as 36%.” Unfortunately, nothing was ever done after that study. In 1998, a new study, by Madrid Complutense states " THC can cause cancer cells to die, and unlike chemotherapy the THC kills nothing but the cancer cells, leaving the brain of course completely unharmed." Watch the below video to show the affect of THC on cancer cells


     
  10. HARTFORD — Two bills proposed to the Connecticut legislature would legalize, regulate and tax recreational marijuana, bringing the state in line with similar efforts underway throughout New England.

    Although the bills are short of details, their sponsors hope they will start a new conversation about marijuana, built from the state's decriminalization of marijuana in 2011 and legalization of the drug for medical uses one year later.

    House Deputy Majority Leader Rep. Juan Candelaria, one of the sponsors, said Wednesday that regulating a recreational marijuana industry could drive existing users of the drug from other illegal activity as well as generate state tax income.

    [​IMG]
    Mohegans Review Pot As Economic Opportunity

    "We have done it for medicinal purposes, and we need to have a broader conversation about recreational uses," Candelaria said in an interview.

    A test balloon of sorts, the bills promise to gauge interest in any legalization effort and to bring the state into a conversation already underway throughout New England.

    In Vermont, lawmakers are pushing to legalize recreational marijuana. Experts expect ballot measures next year on the drug in Massachusetts and Maine, both states that, unlike Connecticut, can change law by voter referendum.

    Rhode Island introduced legislation to legalize the recreational use of the drug last year and is expected to reconsider the issue this year. New Hampshire's House of Representatives was the first legislative body in the United States to vote in favor of recreational marijuana in 2014, albeit in a preliminary vote that did not advance.

    A January report by a market research firm included all of New England among a list of 18 states expected to legalize recreational marijuana by 2020. The report was released by ArcView Market Research, a firm that pairs investors with marijuana-related businesses.

    To marijuana policy experts like Chris Lindsey of the Marijuana Policy Project, the move from voter-led initiatives of the sort that legalized marijuana for recreational purposes in Colorado and Oregon to legislative conversations shows that the issue is no longer as politically toxic as it was once seen by lawmakers.



    "A lot of elected officials are still very gun-shy, but that is thawing," said Lindsey, a policy analyst for the nonprofit marijuana policy reform group, who follows developments in Connecticut. "Even Republicans are talking about taxing marijuana, and it does not hurt them."

    One of the Connecticut bills introduced Feb. 2 by Candelaria, HB 6703, proposes to allow people 21 and older to use marijuana and require the state to regulate the drug's sale, possession, use and growth. Details of the second bill, HB 6473, introduced Jan. 23 by Rep. Edwin Vargas, D-Hartford, read much the same.

    Legalizing recreational marijuana, Vargas said, "could go a long way to help our economy" and provide a small answer to the state's budget deficit. "I think the time is right."

    Recent polls show that Connecticut voters are split on allowing possession of marijuana for recreational purposes.

    Asked in May about recreational use of the drug, 52 percent of the state's voters said they support allowing adults to possess small amounts of marijuana for personal use. Voters under 30, however, supported the measure, 80 percent to 20 percent. The poll, run by Quinnipiac University and calculated with a margin of error of plus or minus 2.6 percentage points, also reported that 52 percent of voters said they had tried the drug.

    Gov. Dannel P. Malloy, who in a September debate admitted that he once smoked marijuana, said in the same event that he opposes the drug's legalization for recreational purposes.

    Malloy spokesman Mark Bergman said Wednesday that the governor believes that there is a need to reform laws about drug possession and to provide second chances for nonviolent offenders, but that a program for recreational marijuana — similar to the medical marijuana program that the governor approved three years ago — is unlikely to be approved.

    "Clearly it is not something he has been supportive of," Bergman said. He added that although a wide range of legislation could emerge on the discussion, "we will see what comes out of that process before we come to a determination."

    On the issue of the General Assembly, sponsors of both bills are clear-eyed, although optimistic.

    Vargas said, "For the most part, people support it. I'm not sure they think that politically it would fly yet, but privately everyone seems to agree with it. I'm not sure people will have the courage to do that on the record."

    He said that if the bill doesn't pass this session, it's likely to come back in the next session.

    To Candelaria, the fact that the drug is being bought and sold already is a strong argument that it should be regulated and taxed to the state's benefit. "We need to start looking outside the box," he said.

    "Are there concerns? There are concerns," he said. "For us in Connecticut, we need to move forward. We can set an example for other states, and I think we will be moving in the right direction."

    denceydenceydencey
     
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