Deep State Corruption ~ Ukraine

Discussion in 'Φ QANON & POLITICS' started by Rose, Nov 25, 2019.

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    Nunes Discusses Burisma, Fisa, and his Suit against WP
     
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    A key Senate committee is vowing to press forward with its investigation targeting former Vice President Joe Biden’s son Hunter, despite logistical challenges posed by the global coronavirus pandemic.

    The probe, which Democrats vigorously oppose, has fueled tension among the Senate’s ranks, even breaking out into a rare and previously unreported verbal altercation between senators during a classified briefing.

    The Senate Homeland Security Committee’s Republican-led inquiry was entering a critical phase last month when senators dropped all nonessential work to focus on delivering economic and medical relief as the coronavirus reached a crisis point in the United States. The Senate is not due back in Washington until April 20 at the earliest.

    “While the chairman is primarily focused on the once-in-a-generation crisis we’re experiencing, our oversight staff is continuing to push ahead with their work. Nothing has changed in our long-term plans for our investigations,” said Austin Altenburg, a spokesman for the committee’s chairman, Sen. Ron Johnson (R-Wisc.).

    In fact, a Senate staffer working on the probe explicitly told one witness’ legal team several weeks ago — just before the wave of lockdowns — that the coronavirus pandemic would not impede the committee’s probe, according to a source familiar with the matter.

    And less than a month ago, a top-secret briefing centered on 2020 election security spiraled into a combative and partisan snipe-fest when Democratic senators began asking about the Biden investigation. It was a reflection of the widespread uneasiness surrounding the probe that was apparent even before the coronavirus pandemic became senators’ top priority.

    The investigation centers on Hunter Biden’s role on the board of Burisma, a Ukrainian energy company, and allegations that a Democratic public-affairs firm sought to leverage Biden’s role to influence State Department policies under the Obama administration. The claims, which Democrats wholly reject, fueled President Donald Trump’s efforts to pressure the Ukrainian government to look into the matter — and Republican senators are investigating the issue as the elder Biden is almost certain to secure the Democratic presidential nomination in the coming weeks.

    A Biden campaign spokesperson said the chairman should instead be focusing on the coronavirus pandemic, and called the probe "an in-kind contribution to the Trump campaign."

    Johnson, who has said his probe has nothing to do with the presidential election, plans to release an interim report soon on the committee’s investigation. But with senators scattered in their home states, much of the panel’s non-coronavirus work is on hold.

    For example, senators are unable to review sensitive documents, many of which are permanently housed in the Senate’s classified facilities, or receive defensive briefings that the committee’s top Democrat, Sen. Gary Peters of Michigan, has demanded. And committee members have yet to vote on a subpoena targeting the public-relations firm which did consulting work for Burisma, Blue Star Strategies — indefinitely delaying lawmakers’ ability to obtain documents viewed as important to the investigation. Additionally, large swaths of Senate staffers are working from home, significantly limiting their access to information.

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    Last edited: Apr 12, 2020
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    During President Trump’s impeachment, former U.S. Ambassador Marie Yovanovitch testified to Congress that she knew little beyond an initial briefing and “press reports” about Burisma Holdings, the Ukrainian natural gas firm that had hired Vice President Joe Biden’s son Hunter and was dogged by a corruption investigation.

    “It just wasn’t a big deal,” she declared under oath on Oct. 11, 2019.

    But newly unearthed State Department memos obtained under the Freedom of Information Act show Yovanovitch’s embassy in Kiev, including the ambassador herself, was engaged in several discussions and meetings about Burisma as the gas firm scrambled during the 2016 election and transition to settle a long-running corruption investigation and polish its image before President Trump took office.

    During President Trump’s impeachment, former U.S. Ambassador Marie Yovanovitch testified to Congress that she knew little beyond an initial briefing and “press reports” about Burisma Holdings, the Ukrainian natural gas firm that had hired Vice President Joe Biden’s son Hunter and was dogged by a corruption investigation.

    “It just wasn’t a big deal,” she declared under oath on Oct. 11, 2019.

    But newly unearthed State Department memos obtained under the Freedom of Information Act show Yovanovitch’s embassy in Kiev, including the ambassador herself, was engaged in several discussions and meetings about Burisma as the gas firm scrambled during the 2016 election and transition to settle a long-running corruption investigation and polish its image before President Trump took office.

    Yovanovitch, for instance, was specifically warned in an email by her top deputy in September 2016 — three years before her testimony — that Burisma had hired an American firm with deep Democratic connections called Blue Star Strategies to “rehabilitate the reputation” of the Ukrainian gas firm and that it had placed “Hunter Biden on its board,” the memos show.

    She also met directly with a representative for Burisma in her embassy office, less than 45 days before Trump took office, a contact she did not mention during her impeachment deposition.

    The discussions about Burisma inside Yovanovitch’s embassy were so extensive, in fact, that they filled more than 160 pages of emails, memos and correspondence in fall 2016 alone, according to the State Department records obtained under FOIA by the conservative group Citizens United.

    The contacts included a detailed private letter hand-delivered to Yovanovitch by one of Burisma’s lawyers in September 2016, a briefing later that month from her staff on Burisma’s issues, and a meeting scheduled between the ambassador and a Burisma representative shortly before Christmas 2016 as the Obama administration was preparing to leave office.

    Yovanovitch, who recently retired from State, did not respond Tuesday to a message sent to her private email seeking comment. Her lawyer during the impeachment proceedings, Lawrence S. Robbins, also did not respond to an emailed request for comment.

    State officials declined comment.

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    Documents show Amb. Yovanovitch's impeachment testimony left out mention of Burisma meetings, letters; insight from Fox News contributor John Solomon and Rep. Lee Zeldin, Republican member of the House Foreign Affairs Committee.
     
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    The infamous story of Joe Biden’s effort to force the firing of Ukraine’s chief prosecutor in 2016 has taken a new legal twist in Kiev, just as the former vice president is sewing up the 2020 Democratic presidential nomination in America.

    In Kiev late last month, District Court Judge S. V. Vovk ordered the country’s law enforcement services to formally list the fired prosecutor, Victor Shokin, as the victim of an alleged crime by the former U.S. vice president, according to an official English translation of the ruling obtained by Just the News.

    The court had previously ordered the Prosecutor General’s Office and the State Bureau of Investigations in February to investigate Shokin’s claim that he was fired in spring 2016 under pressure from Biden because he was investigating Burisma Holdings, the natural gas company where Biden’s son Hunter worked.

    The infamous story of Joe Biden’s effort to force the firing of Ukraine’s chief prosecutor in 2016 has taken a new legal twist in Kiev, just as the former vice president is sewing up the 2020 Democratic presidential nomination in America.

    The court ruled then that there was adequate evidence to investigate Shokin’s claim that Biden’s pressure on then-President Petro Poroshenko, including a threat to withhold $1 billion in U.S. loan guarantees, amounted to unlawful interference in Shokin’s work as Ukraine’s chief prosecutor.

    But when law enforcement agencies opened the probe they refused to name Biden as the alleged perpetrator of the crime, instead listing the potential defendant as an unnamed American.

    Vovk ruled that anonymous listing was improper and ordered the law enforcement agencies to formally name Biden as the accused perpetrator.

    The ruling orders “a competent person of the Office of the Prosecutor General of Ukraine who conducts procedural management in criminal proceedings No. 62020000000000236 dated February 24, 2020 to enter information into the Unified register of pre-trial investigations … a summary of facts that may indicate the commission of a criminal offense under Paragraph 2 of Article 343 of the Criminal procedure code of Ukraine on criminal proceedings No. 62020000000000236 dated February 24, 2020, namely: information on interference in the activities of the former Prosecutor General of Ukraine Shokin, Viktor Mykolaiovych performed by citizen of the United States of America Joseph Biden, former U.S. Vice President.”

    The judge added, “the order of the court may not be appealed.”

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